Monthly Archives: October 2013

Gearing up for Nanowrimo

So it’s October and that means I’m gearing up for Nanowrimo. I’m plotting and scheming like any good villain, throwing every enemy and roadblock I can find at my characters. But it also means brainpower is at a minimum for anything not novel based. So today I’m going to share the new WIP with you. Because you’re soo interested, I know.

You might recognize this format from last October, but hey, like I said, brainpower at a minimum.

What is the working title of your book?

Right now, I’m calling it TALON Force, but in the long run that might be the name of the series. I’m not sure I’ll be able to name it until I get to know the characters and the conflict a little better.

Where did the idea come from?

I was watching a video by Corridor Digital online (this one to be exact; go check it out, they’re excellent). In one particular scene a teenage programmer is kidnapped because she managed to do something she wasn’t supposed to. I loved the idea of someone so young being so valuable for their skills. The image really took hold of me and I couldn’t stop worrying at it until I had a character and an exciting problem for him to solve.

What genre does your book fall under?

I’d call it Middle Grade Urban Fantasy.

Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

I really don’t cast my books. I know some authors will tell you we all do it, if only in secret, but I promise I’m not one of them. See this post for my opinion on the subject.

What is the one sentence synopsis of your book?

A fourteen year old hacker uncovers a secret that lands him a place in a covert government agency. Or Agent Cody Banks meets a fantasy Men In Black. Whichever gets the point across.

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

I am currently looking for an agent. The process is slow and incredibly painful to my self-esteem but to quote a character from A Shroud For My Bride, you can’t go back, you can only go forward.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

I’m going to write this one for Nanowrimo this year, so it’s not done yet. Or even started. But I’m planning on it being between 60,000 and 70,000 words, a little shorter than my normal, so there’s a good chance I’ll get it done in the month.

The Lightning ThiefWhat other books would you compare this story to within your genre?Artemis Fowl

I’m going to say Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson  and  the Olympians series for the whole fighting monsters aspect, only, you know, not Greek. And Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl for the whole kid genius thing.

Who or what inspired you to write this book?

I think this one came from a workshop I attended at the Pikes Peak Witer’s Conference where Darby Karchut talked about writing books for boys. I’d rather there weren’t “boy books” or “girl books”. I want kids to feel comfortable reading whatever happens to interest them, but I recognize the idealism in that. And Darby is so good and enthusiastic about what she does, I couldn’t help but catch the bug.

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

This is a left turn from the disabled fairytales I usually write, so we’ll see how it works out. Nate has Cerebral Palsy, but it’s much more understated than Merry’s paraplegia, or Kallan’s OCD. It will affect his character and the plot, because how could it not? But it won’t be a major theme of the book.

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The Michael J Fox Show

I grew up with Back to the Future, Doc Hollywood, and Homeward Bound, so I’ve always been a fan of Michael J. Fox. I even love Atlantis, despite the gaping plot holes that threaten to swallow someone. But Fox slowed down a little in 1998 after he announced he’d been diagnosed with Parkinson’s.  Completely understandable, but here’s what I like best about this story. There’s another chapter.

Fox didn’t fall off the face of the Earth after his diagnosis. He did some guest spots, a few voices, and now he’s doing The Michael J Fox Show. In the interview above, Fox talked about doing his guest appearances and realizing that acting is what he loves. And thank goodness, because the man is a brilliant actor and he’s just getting better. The guest part he played on Scrubs is probably one of my favorites. Take a look.

Who knew you could channel Parkinson’s to bring OCD to life? I really nerd out over actors and comedians using their disabilities as an advantage. Phamaly for example. And Samuel J. Comroe. And now Michael J. Fox. He even talked about finding new depths in his work while dealing with his disease.

I’ve seen the first couple episodes of the new show and I’m really excited. I’m totally on board with the whole comedy is tragedy plus time thing. Sometimes it just has to be funny, and humor can be the best way to bridge the gap between people. Again, Phamaly and Samuel J. Comroe come to mind.

So far The Michael J. Fox Show avoids the “inspiration porn” trap, even going so far as to make fun of it. It’s great to see a work of fiction on TV that portrays someone with a disability just getting on with their life, with the same joys and fears and family drama everyone else has.

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Changing Perceptions

CrutchIt’s funny how perceptions change over time. Priorities shift as experience affects your perception of life.

For years after my injury, I hated being offered help, especially for something that I only had a little trouble with. I was fighting for my freedom, and it was really important for me to do things for myself. Things like opening doors and going up ramps. I recognize that those are the ones that look extra hard, but they’re really not, and I resented the people who were just trying to help.

After a while I realized it wasn’t really the people I hated. It was the fact that I needed the help in the first place, and those thoughtful bystanders were just the physical representation of my disability. Of course, knowing that didn’t change those feelings. At least not overnight.

But the other day I was in Noodles & Co, and a nice guy jumped up to grab the door for me as I walked out. Funny. No resentment. No self-loathing. Just gratefulness. And a lot of relief. I even joked with him. “These doors are so heavy. Who are they trying to keep out?”

So what’s changed? Did I grow up? Or did I grow out of it? I think I’ve just realized I have nothing to prove – to the world or to myself. And the fight isn’t worth it when the prize is sore legs and a sour expression.

I had a similar revelation last year about using my chair more often. And to be fair, I haven’t resented anyone who’s opened a door for me in a while, but every now and then I’m struck with a then-and-now moment like that.

The way I thought before wasn’t exactly wrong (I’m not sure it was healthy for me but it wasn’t wrong). I needed those moments of self-sufficiency. Independence was important to me at that point in my life. But I’ve lived longer now, I’ve done things I hadn’t then. Different fights are important to me now. This is one I can leave in the past.

So next time you see me, feel free to run ahead and open that door. I promise not to bite your head off.

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What’s in a Name?

Last week I talked about book covers and which ones worked for me and which ones didn’t. Becca made the comment that if we didn’t have covers to look at, we’d judge a book by its title. So of course I decided to do the same thing but looking only at a book’s title instead of the whole cover. And in keeping with that, I’m not going to post the covers at all so you guys can see what you think. Oh, all right. I’ll link to their Goodreads pages so you can check out the ones you really like.

 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

  • One of the tricks of writing compelling sentences or plot elements is to break expectations. I think this one does that very well. It’s very ordinary until suddenly it’s not.

Sex, Lies and Online Dating

  • You just know this is going to be fun

Miserere: An Autumn Tale

  • I picked this book up because it sounded like “misery” and that was too intriguing to pass up. I think some of the best titles are the ones that mean more after you’ve read the book and know all the implications.

The Deed of Paksenarrion

  • What deed? What awesome thing does this chick do to get a book named after her? Actually, it’s the title of the series, but still great.

Anna Dressed in Blood

  • You don’t need to see the cover. The title says it all.

The Shifter

  • This is a sad story. Originally Janice Hardy called this book The Pain Merchants. So unexpected and intriguing, right? The publisher decided to go with The Shifter which turned it into just another fantasy novel. Sigh.

Sabriel

  • As much as I love this book, I’m just not a fan of titles that are names.

I Am Number Four

  • You are? Where are numbers one, two, and three? I picked this book up just to answer that question.

The Forest of Hands and Teeth

  • Was there ever a title with a less deserving book behind it?

Warbreaker

  • It’s hard to name a fantasy without sounding vague or cheesy. Brandon Sanderson’s got it down.

The Dollhouse Asylum

  • I have no idea what this is about but I have to read it.

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

  • Probably my favorite title of all time. 

 

So what titles grab you and make you want to pick up the book?

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